First responders bring mental health awareness using Battle of the Omaha Firefighters

Wear their shoes to bring awareness to mental health. NOT FORGOTTEN THIS MORNING 5K MEMORIAL RUN REMEMBERED OMAHA FIREFIGHTER AND HIS struggle with PTSD KETV NEWSWATCH SEVEN, KAYLEE SEARCY HAS OUR STORY. If the voice of the passer-by runner had interrupted Sprintingor Fa cause his friend Jeremy Tenno-Arvad to be remembered, he was such a friend in the family that many affected were not an engineer with Omaha as a junior individual for 12 years before his last call in 2019 was answered multiple times. These are the first responders. We don’t prioritize mental health so this is all just remembering first responders we need to look at our mental HEALT and make sure we’re doing just fine using first time not saved other memory we suffer in silence some of us deal in every day, And not just the first responders, but the restricted people are the people who provide their services to ORIENDTE INDUSTRIES. All organizations are seeing a rise in some of these issues with Head Support and Combat Team Rob Gooch saying sometimes there are some things that people struggle with, and it’s easy to stick with them and start bringing them up. The issue is always there for everyone, but some of these very private people and Ethan may see this as a sign of weakness or that it’s not our responsibility or I’ll handle it myself. Gooch says Liv can be a challenge. So if you’re having a hard time getting help out of the game it can kind of spiral out of control at times and we want people to help if they need help and that’s where we are

First responders bring mental health awareness using Battle of the Omaha Firefighters

The community put on their shoes to support mental health awareness and remember an Omaha firefighter’s battle with PTSD.

Hearing the alarm, the contestants sped off for a cause. Friend and colleague, Rushd Dakos, said, “Remember, Jeremy Knott, he was a professional firefighter. He was a friend and a family member to many, he influenced them.” Knut has been an Omaha Fire Department engineer for 12 years, fighting his own mental health battle with PTSD, in response to his last call in 2019. “Often as first responders, we don’t prioritize our mental health. So this is just a reminder that As first responders, we have to take a look at our mental health and make sure we’re okay,” said Dakos, using the first “Knott Forgotten Memorial Run” to ensure others don’t suffer in silence. day. And not just first responders, but military personnel. They are people who work in service-oriented industries, and all organizations are seeing a rise in some of these issues.” He said sometimes the signs are there. He said, “We see some things where people are struggling, and it’s easy to confront them and start asking questions, and then encourage them to get “Some very private people might see this as a sign of weakness, or that it’s not our responsibility, or that I’m going to handle it myself,” Goch said. Life can be a challenge, he said. So if you’re struggling, help is there. “Things can get out of hand sometimes, and we want people to have help if they need it,” Goch said. And that’s what we’re here for.” All proceeds from the Memorial Run will go to First Responders Foundation, to help support mental health.

Hearing the alarm, the contestants sped off for a cause.

Friend and colleague, Rushd Dakos, said, “Let’s remember, Jeremy Knott, he was a dedicated firefighter. He was a friend and a family member to many, he influenced them.”

Knott has been an engineer with the Omaha Fire Department for 12 years, fighting his own mental health battle with PTSD, and responding to his last call in 2019.

“A lot of times as first responders, we don’t prioritize our mental health. So this is just a reminder that as first responders, we need to take a look at our mental health and make sure we are okay,” Dakos said.

Use the first “Knott Forgotten Memorial Run” to ensure that others do not suffer in silence.

“It’s something we deal with every day. And it’s not just first responders, it’s military personnel. They’re people who work in service-oriented industries, and all organizations are seeing a rise in some of these issues,” said Rob Gooch, the battalion commander.

Sometimes he said the signs are there.

“We see some things where people are suffering, and it’s easy to confront them and start asking questions, and then encourage them to get help,” he said.

But this is not always the case for everyone.

“Some very private people might see that as a sign of weakness, or that it’s not our responsibility, or that I’m going to handle it myself,” Gooch said.

He said life can be a challenge, so if you’re struggling, help is there.

“Things can get out of hand sometimes, and we want people to get help if they need it. And that’s what we’re there for,” Goch said.

All proceeds from the Memorial Run will go to the First Responders Foundation, to help support mental health.