The stigma of seeking mental health help discourages many people

Appropriate intervention during stressful times can prevent this stress from developing into a major mental health challenge.

Laurie Kress is the director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services. Amy Chadwick is the interim director of RecoveryOhio.

We realize that the challenges we faced have made us more aware of how important it is to take care of our mental health and consider the mental health of others.

We are proud of the commitment the DeWine management has made to provide support Treating mental health and substance abuse For all Ohioans who need it, starting with the establishment recovery

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This initiative coordinates and manages prevention, interdiction, treatment and long-term recovery support across government.

Last month, Governor Mike DeWine announced an investment of $169 million to strengthen our behavioral health services system.

plan for invest 85 million dollars Towards building the behavioral health workforce we need, with paid internships and scholarships opportunities for students pursuing related degrees and credentials at Ohio colleges and universities.

We are investing another $84 million in Children’s Behavioral Health Initiative to increase the capacity and Access to child care and their families across the state.

Stress is a natural reaction to life's challenges.  How he manages it can determine whether he is exhausted.

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This investment in capacity building comes on top of the large resources that already exist for people Suffer from a substance use disorder or mental health conditions:

  • In 2019, we launched the Student Health and Success Program, with $1.2 billion dedicated to helping schools meet students’ social and emotional needs.
  • The $69 million investment supports the development of local crisis systems to expand crisis stabilization services to Ohioans showing signs of mental illness or addiction.
Laurie Kress is the director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

Even with all this, the need for greater awareness and more resources to address mental health challenges is enormous. In the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services of Ohio and RecoveryOhio, we’ve been talking a lot lately about a tool that everyone can use to help themselves and others. it’s called Stress first aidJust as CPR can save a person having a heart attack, proper intervention in moment of tension This can prevent stress from developing into a major mental health challenge.

Amy Chadwick is the interim director of RecoveryOhio.

It is important to realize that stress is a The natural human response to life’s challenges. It’s how we manage it that determines whether or not it becomes exhausted. When stress is intense or prolonged, its physical and emotional responses can become harmful.

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Practicing stress first aid can help a person recognize and defuse stress in themselves and do the same to others. 30-minute presentation, which you can download from https://bit.ly/3t5MLlPProvides a comprehensive foundation in the basics.

at workStress First Aid gives colleagues a common language to talk about stress. By encouraging everyone to recognize and treat stress, it reduces the stigma around mental health challenges.

When stress is intense or prolonged, its physical and emotional responses can become harmful.

It is meant to be adaptable according to different personalities and situations. The model identifies four levels of stress, from optimal functioning to “illness,” which can stem from clinical mental disorder or severe untreated stress. If someone shows signs of stress, that determines A series of measures aimed at pacification Reassure the person and, if necessary, refer them to professional help.

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