Hamilton County commissioners back World Cup bid, agree to spend $10 million on PBS

There were concerns, questions and concerns, but Hamilton County remained in the World Cup lottery on Thursday. Weeks when FIFA announced the 10 US cities that would host the World Cup matches in 2026, even after approval, calculating the cost was complicated, provincial leaders valued staying in pursuit or withdrawing, and there was a deluge of conflicting opinions about from many quarters. Some citizens questioned the size of the estimated economic benefit. At a minimum, the bid would require a $10 million upgrade to Paul Brown Stadium and then unknown amounts. “What concerns me today is the process, the cost, the time and the risk,” said Alicia Reis, deputy chairperson of the commission, who lobbied hard for costs to be set, noting that there was nothing written from the Bengals team on the subject. The lease expired at the same time as matches “There is talk of Kentucky being on the plane,” Reese said during a lengthy recitation of the troubles on the road. “That’s gone.” Kentucky did not have to sign this document consisting of 257 pages. They are not in trouble.” To that end, civic leaders who were hoping to make it to the World Cup sent a letter to the county today saying, “A comprehensive funding plan will be developed to meet all FIFA requirements. We have already pledged to raise an estimated $35-50 million. “That was enough for the other commissioners.” We’re not trying to raise any taxes or anything like that,” Commission Chair Stephanie Somero Dumas. “We’ll be working with private entities, partnering with every agency you can think of.” Commissioner Dennis Dryhaus described it as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. An impact you can’t measure,” Dryhaus emphasized. “It’s all about the marketing, promotion, and feel-good that comes with hosting an event like this. Just like what happened with the Super Bowl that wasn’t here and we’re still getting some of that.” Duma admitted that the county didn’t know what the total cost would be, but decided it was worth the investment, and Reese clearly asked if the Bengals were OK with the changes It would be required for football and if there was a legally binding document to that effect, manager Jeff Allotto replied there. There was no binding confirmation from the team, only that they were involved in the discussions and kept abreast of how things were going, and the city would still need an envisaged 800 room hotel south Convention Center live, this will be a $ 360 million project required no later than the end of 2025, so, there is still a lot to do, if the city is chosen in a couple of weeks, Aluotto expects to have a visit by FIFA to tour in the months coming.

Fears, questions and concerns persisted, but Hamilton County remained in the World Cup sweepstakes Thursday.

Before the deadline, Hamilton County commissioners voted 2-0 with one abstention to remain in the bidding search.

They’ll find out in a fortnight when FIFA announces ten US cities that will host the World Cup matches in 2026.

Even after approval, calculating the cost is still complicated.

County leaders weighed the value of staying in pursuit or withdrawing.

There was a flood of conflicting opinions about it from many sides.

Some citizens questioned the size of the estimated economic benefit.

At a minimum, the bid would require a $10 million upgrade to Paul Brown Stadium and then unknown amounts.

“What concerns me today is the process, the cost, the time and the risks,” said Deputy Commissioner Alicia Reis, who lobbied hard for costs to be set.

She noted that there was nothing written from Bengal on the subject. The lease expires at the same time the World Cup matches are played at the stadium if Cincinnati is one of the ten selected.

“There is talk of Kentucky being on board,” Reese said during a lengthy recitation of the problems she has with the way things are going. “Kentucky should not have signed this 257-page document. They are not in trouble.”

To this end, civic leaders who were hoping to make it to the World Cup sent a letter to the province today saying: “A comprehensive funding plan will be developed to meet all FIFA requirements. We have already pledged to raise an estimated $35-50 million.”

That was enough for the other commissioners.

“We are not trying to increase any taxes or anything like that,” Commission Chairwoman Stephanie Somero Dumas noted. “We’ll be working with private entities, partnering with every agency you can think of.”

Commissioner Dennis Dryhaus described it as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

“There’s this effect that you can’t measure,” Dryhaus emphasized. “It’s all about the marketing and the promotion and the good feeling that comes with hosting an event like this. Just like what happened with the Super Bowl that wasn’t here and we still get some of that.”

I always acknowledge that the county does not know the total cost.

But she decided it was worth the investment.

Reese explicitly asked if the Bengals were OK with the changes that would be required for football and if there was a legally binding document to that effect.

Manager Jeff Allotto replied that there were no binding assurances from the team, only that they were involved in the discussions and kept abreast of how things went.

The city will still need an 800-room hotel envisioned directly south of the convention center.

This will be a $360 million project required no later than the end of 2025.

So, there is still a lot to come.

If the city is chosen in two weeks’ time, Aluotto expects there will be a visit by FIFA to tour in the coming months.