Children’s Commissioner says ‘Girls love hard math’ after claiming girls don’t want to study physics

The Children’s Commissioner said girls “like hard math” in apparent criticism of Caesar’s comments by another previous government about girls’ dislike for taking A-level physics.

Speaking at the annual conference of the Federation of Schools Association in Birmingham on Friday, Ms Rachel de Souza said she had opened Sir Isaac Newton School, a free post-16 math and science school in Norwich, adding: “I just want to tell you that in my view, girls They love hard math.

And the girls at Big Ask (its survey of children after the pandemic) I spoke to talked about the importance of female STEM models, and this was the problem entering the classroom when there were all the boys in physics.

“It wasn’t that they couldn’t do hard math.”

Earlier this year, Catherine Berbalsingh, the government’s social mobility czar and principal of the school, said that “physics is not something girls tend to fancy” and that “there is a lot of hard math that I think she’d rather not do.”

Pressed on why girls don’t want to do more difficult calculations, she added, “Research in general… just says that this is normal… I don’t think there is anything external.”

The Commissioner for Children, Mrs. Rachel D'Souza, said at the Birmingham conference that girls love hard math, and it is the boys-only physics classes that prevent them from taking the subject.

The Commissioner for Children, Mrs. Rachel D’Souza, said at the Birmingham conference that girls love hard math, and it is the boys-only physics classes that prevent them from taking the subject.

Ms. Rachel's remarks seem to refer to government social mobility czar and school principal Catherine Berbalsing (pictured), who recently said that 'physics is not something girls tend to fancy' and that 'there is a lot of hard math out there that I think she'd rather not do'

Ms. Rachel’s remarks seem to refer to government social mobility czar and school principal Catherine Berbalsing (pictured), who recently said that ‘physics is not something girls tend to fancy’ and that ‘there is a lot of hard math out there that I think she’d rather not do’ “

But the girls did better than the boys in both A-level and GCSE math for the first time ever last year.

Ms Pirpalsingh, 49, was addressing the Science and Technology Committee on Diversity and Inclusion at Stem (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in April when she made the remarks.

The Tiger Overlooker and Community Free School Foundation Michaela at Wembley discussed why only 16 percent of A-level physics students are female, lower than the national average of 23 percent.

The school is often referred to as ‘the UK’s strictest’ and has rules including no talking in corridors, a one-way system and encouraging students to turn over their phones on Monday morning – to be turned back on Friday after school.

Students could be placed in detention for not making eye contact or forgetting to bring a second pencil to school.

In co-ed schools, girls are two and a half times less likely to advance to a first level in physics than their peers in single-sex schools, according to research by the Institute of Physics.

A report by the authority said the statistics strongly suggest that gender biases played a role in the subjects chosen by students, exacerbated by gender stereotyping by teachers, parents and the media.

Ms Pirpalsingh told the STEM Committee there was “certainly no campaign” for more girls to do physics.

Ms. Rachel told the conference that children talked to her about issues such as poverty, housing and overcrowding

Ms. Rachel told the conference that children talked to her about issues such as poverty, housing and overcrowding

Scholars describe Kaiser's comments on navigating around girls who don't want to do math as

Scholars called Kaiser’s comments about navigating girls who don’t want to do math “terrifying” and received widespread backlash across the internet.

“I don’t mind it’s only 16%,” she said. “I want them to do what they want to do.”

Her comments were described as “horrifying” and “outrageous” by leading scholars.

Meanwhile, Ms. Rachel wants to extend free school meals over the summer and “rebuild childhood” after the severe impact of the coronavirus pandemic on children.

It has also called for an extension of the £20-a-week universal credit increase.

Ms Rachel also visited the Arch Bolton Academy on Friday and told the Birmingham conference: ‘Children, mothers and families are talking about [that] “There is no safe place to go, which is why our kids sit down to play on PS4, because I am afraid of what they will meet at their local store, on the street and I worry about the park.”

She added that there was “incredibly harmful content” online for children and that parents had told her they were “absolutely terrified” and wanted to keep their children safe.

She said the pupils talked to her about “poverty, about housing, about overcrowding, what it’s like to sleep in the bedroom, to sleep in the living room as your bedroom with ten others and to try to get an education.”

Ms Rachel said the ‘first’ priority for schools and trusts would be to get children back to school in September, and she had set a goal of 100% attendance for the fall 2022 semester.

“Whether it’s the Secretary of State or whoever’s standing here, that’s where we want the resources to go,” she said, adding that if the trusts said they would get every pupil back “whatever it takes, I know we’ll do better.”

She also gave a speech in Birmingham yesterday, in which she said: “Making sure children’s voices are heard is the real reason this office exists.

“However, oftentimes, it is not just a privilege but a humility to be trusted with what they tell me.”

Mrs. Rachel was CEO of an academic chain of 14 schools across Norfolk and Suffolk before taking up her commissioned position.

Joe Saxton, chief organizer at Ofqual, told CST that pupils don’t want Covid scores and “really, really want to take their exams”.

She said this year was a “stepping stone” before returning to pre-pandemic GCSE and A-level standards.

I should be clear that while on the one hand this will be the most generously rated series of exam results ever, the results will nonetheless be higher than they were in 2019, and the results will be lower than they were in 2021.

Your schools are more likely to find that their scores are lower than in 2021 when you don’t pass exams. Schools that score higher than 2021 will be few and far between.

“I see it as my job to make sure that no student is denied a math question that depends on understanding the names of seats in the theater or that your ability to be assessed in a foreign language does not depend on whether or not you will be assessed in a foreign language,” she added. You know ski trip etiquette’, a reference to past GCSE exam questions that have been criticized as socially exclusive.

I gave a “sincere thanks to you – to the teaching and support staff – for everything you do to make the exam season a success for your students: from the hard work that goes into preparing students, to supporting the efficient operation of the series in your centers”.

“I would like to extend my best wishes to every student who participates in exams and assessments this summer, and wish them all the best in their upcoming assessments and in their future plans.”

“I want to hear voices that have never been heard before, from minorities or vulnerable groups of course, but also from a child whose identity might fall between definitions that might lend a certain thing,” said Ms. Rachel, who set her goals when she began her role in March 2021. need or defect.

During my tenure, I want my work to improve the chances of every child, regardless of his early status in life, wherever he may be, from the inner city to the farthest corner of every county in England.

Those present who had listened to Mrs. Rachel’s address this morning quickly took to social media to express their support.

One user wrote: Great hearing [Dame Rachel] Throwing challenges on trust in leaders, especially with regard to attendance and children in care. He brought the children’s voice very firmly into the discussion.

The second added, “It is a privilege to hear Ms. Rachel de Sousa speak passionately about her desire to change children’s lives.”

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